Binge-Eating Disorder

Binge-Eating Disorder

Mallorie Joplin, Reporter

Binge-eating can become a big problem in today’s society. It’s a serious eating disorder in which you frequently consume unusual amounts of food and/or feel as if you can’t stop eating. Almost everyone overeats occasionally, resulting in having seconds or thirds of some sort of big meal. But for some people, excessive overeating that can feel out of control and become a regular occurrence crosses the line to the “binge-eating disorder”. When you are having this sort of craving for a portion of new food, you may be embarrassed about overeating and vow to stop, but then feel such of a compulsion that you can’t resist the urges and continue to binge eat. Most people with binge-eating disorders are overweight and/or are obese, but you may be at a normal weight. Behavioral and emotional signs and symptoms of binge-eating disorder may include you too:

  • Eating unusually large amounts of food in a specific amount of time, such as over two hours
  • Feeling that your eating behavior is out of control
  • Eating even when you’re full or not hungry
  • Eating rapidly during binge episodes
  • Eating until you’re uncomfortably full
  • Frequently eating alone or in secret
  • Feeling depressed, disgusted, ashamed, guilty, or upset about your eating
  • Frequently dieting, possibly without weight loss

Seeing a doctor for this sort of condition is highly recommended. Binge-eating problems can vary in their course from short-lived to recurrent or they may persist for years if left untreated. Talking to a medical provider or a mental health professional about your binge-eating symptoms and feelings can help. If someone you know is going through this sort of hard factor, provide them with encouragement and support. Offer to help them out to find a qualified mental health provider and make an appointment as soon as possible. You might even offer to go along.